The Weeds and Pests on Public Land (WPPL) program funds landscape-scale weed and pest projects, focusing on protecting Victoria’s biodiversity. The program is working to achieve the vision of Biodiversity 2037, Victoria’s plan to stop the decline of our native plants and animals and ensure our natural environment is healthy and resilient.

The program invests $3.1 million each year across approximately 10 per cent of the state throughout Victoria’s highest biodiversity assets. A further $1 million is contributed each year by delivery partner, Parks Victoria.

WPPL infographic

Partners

The program has been running for 15 years and is delivered by the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) – Forest, Fire and Regions and Parks Victoria, along with more than 27 partners and stakeholders across the state. These include Traditional Owner groups, Agriculture Victoria, Arthur Rylah Institute, Melbourne Water, Vic Roads, local government agencies, Catchment Management Authorities, universities, community organisations and volunteers. Partners are key to the success of the program and contribute through planning investment, research and monitoring, planning, delivery and volunteer hours.

Supporting Biodiversity 2037

Alongside WPPL projects, the Victorian Government is investing $86.3 million to implement Biodiversity 2037, over the first four years of the plan. This includes $34.77 million of investment in in Biodiversity Response Planning (BRP), a new area-based planning approach to biodiversity conservation in Victoria. Biodiversity Response Planning was designed to strengthen alignment, collaboration and participation between government agencies, Traditional Owners, non-government agencies (NGOs) and the community. A full list of BRP projects can be found on our webpage.

Projects

There are four streams of projects as outlined below, currently the program funds ten flagship projects across Victoria including the Ark, Eden, Bounceback and Weeds at the Early Stage of Invasion (WESI) projects:

  • Predator control: Ark projects target foxes and benefit a wide range of native mammals, birds and reptiles
  • Weed control: Eden projects detect and control high risk weed species that threaten biodiversity values
  • Herbivore control: The Mallee Bounceback Rabbit Control project aims to protect and restore the biodiversity of semi-arid woodlands.
  • Capability building: The WESI project builds the capability of land managers to respond to early invader weeds

Find information on each individual project using the drop down menus at the bottom of this page.

This map displays the areas of projects funded through the Weeds and Pests on Public Land program:

Map of project areas funded through WPPL program

How can you help? 

  • Join your local Friends or Landcare group, or explore volunteer opportunities with the Parks Victoria tool, ParkConnect
  • Join the Safe Cat, Safe Wildlife community
  • Consider selection of garden plants carefully; many of our environmental weeds start out in gardens. Consider planting Victorian indigenous species. Practice responsible disposal of garden waste.
  • Don’t spread weeds through the bush; practice good vehicle hygiene
  • Report new and unusual plant/weed sightings to Agriculture Victoria

Predator control

The Glenelg Ark is a collaborative landscape-scale fox control project operating in south-west Victoria. The project is delivered by DELWP in partnership with Parks Victoria, Agriculture Victoria, Glenelg Hopkins Catchment Management Authority, the Arthur Rylah Institute and the University of Melbourne.

This important local project is helping to protect native plants and animals including the endangered Southern Brown Bandicoot,which inhabits parts of southern Australia including the south-west of Victoria. The project targets the fox, a known predator of the Southern Brown Bandicoot. Baits are used to control foxes across 90,000 hectares of public land in south-west Victoria.

The Glenelg Ark project includes a comprehensive monitoring plan which measures how reducing populations of foxesbenefits the Southern Brown Bandicoot, Long-nosed Potoroo, and the Common Brushtail Possum. The number of foxes appear to have declined within treated areas as indicated by a significant decline in bait take from 2005 to 2013. Monitoring of the three native mammals within treatment and non-treatment areas show the benefits of continued landscape scale fox control.

Target pest

European Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes)

Native species of interest

Southern Brown Bandicoot (Isoodon obesulus), Long-nosed Potoroo (Potorous tridactylus),  Common Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

Partners

DELWP, Parks Victoria, Agriculture Victoria, Glenelg Hopkins CMA, Arthur Rylah Institute, University of Melbourne

How can you help?

  • Undertake fox control on private land. Further information can be found at Agriculture Victoria
  • Join your local Friends or Landcare group, or explore volunteer opportunities with the Parks Victoria tool, ParkConnect
  • Join the Safe Cat, Safe Wildlife community
  • If you are visiting areas with fox control, please adhere to signage, restrain domestic animals or pets, and do not disturb baits

Find out more

Image of Southern Brown Bandicoot

Image of a Southern Brown Bandicoot courtesy of the Glenelg Ark project.

The Grampians National Park has long been home to the to the endangered Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby, a small and agile macropod found in rugged, rocky areas of south-east Australia. The Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby seeks rocky-escarpments during the day and emerge at dusk to feed on native grasses and other vegetation. Foxes pose a huge threat to this rock wallaby as well as many other native animals that call the Grampians home. For the past 20 years, Parks Victoria has been working hard to protect small mammals by controlling fox numbers.

The Grampians Ark project delivers fox control across 226,000 hectares of Grampians National Park, Black Range State Park, Grampians State Forest and adjoining private land in partnership with the Mirranatwa and Pannyabyr Landcare groups. A key highlight of the program has been the 2008 reintroduction program for the Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby. In 2015, the project was awarded the Nancy Millis Science in Parks Award for the joint Parks Victoria – Deakin University long-term small mammal monitoring project. The project was also awarded a 2017 Victorian Community Environmental Sustainability Award for collaboration with Mirranatwa and Pannyabyr Landcare Groups.

Target pest

European Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes)

Native species of interest

Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillate), Long Nosed Potoroo (Potorous tridactylus), Southern Brown Bandicoot (Isoodon obesulus), Heath Mouse (Pseudomys shortridgei), Smoky Mouse (Pseudomys fumeus)

Partners

Parks Victoria, DELWP, Mirranatwa Landcare Group, Pannyabyr Landcare Group, Victorian Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby Recovery Team

How can you help?

Find out more

Follow @Wild_Grampians on Twitter to stay up to date with Deakin University research in the area.

Far East Gippsland is a hotspot for native mammals, birds and reptiles, many of which are rare or extinct in other parts of Victoria. Unfortunately, the local biodiversity is threatened by foxes. The Southern Ark project aims to reduce the number of foxes and support the recovery of all native animals populations. The project assists the recovery of many species including the Long-footed and Long-nosed Potoroo, the Southern Brown Bandicoot and the Southern Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby across around 1 million hectares.  The Southern Ark project covers state forest, national parks and private land across the entire eastern wedge of Victoria, from the Snowy River valley to Cape Howe.

The Southern Ark project has continued the work of land managers who have ran an extensive program of research, testing, baiting and monitoring in the area since 1995.  Over the years, the program has successfully controlled fox numbers and increased numbers of native mammals.

Target pest

European Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes)

Native species of interest

Long-nosed Potoroo (Potorous tridactylus), Long-footed Potoroo (Potorous longipes), Southern Brown Bandicoot (Isoodon obesulus), Long-nosed Bandicoot (Perameles nasuta), Common Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), Mountain Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus cunninghami), Spotted-tailed Quoll (Dasyurus maculatus), Southern Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby, (Petrogale penicillate)

Partners

DELWP, Parks Victoria, Moogji Aboriginal Council, Field Naturalists Club of Victoria

How can you help?

  • Landholders can get involved by joining in as part of the Community Baiting Programs. Further information can be found at Agriculture Victoria
  • Join your local Friends or Landcare group, or explore volunteer opportunities with the Parks Victoria tool, ParkConnect
  • Join the Safe Cat, Safe Wildlife community
  • If you are visiting areas with fox control, please adhere to signage, restrain domestic animals or pets, and do not disturb baits

The Long-footed Potoroo is a small forest-dwelling kangaroo which inhabits forest with a dense understory in East Gippsland, south-eastern New South Wales and north-eastern Victoria. The Victorian Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 lists the Long-footed Potoroo as Endangered. Feeding almost entirely on hypogenous (underground fruiting) fungi, the Long-footed Potoroo depends on dense moist habitat all year round.

Long-footed Potoroos appear to occur in small, low-density colonies, which are vulnerable to random environmental processes, such as wildfire and climate change. The Barry Mountains Fox Control project targets a known predator of this species, the fox.

The project began in 2004 after the 2003 bushfires that impacted significantly on Long-footed Potoroo habitat in the Alpine National Park and Buffalo River State Forest. Parks Victoria lead the project in partnership with DELWP, which delivers over 48,000 hectares of fox control in the project area.

Target pest

European Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes)

Native species of interest

Long-footed Potoroo (Potorous longipes)

Partners

Parks Victoria, DELWP

How can you help?

  • The Barry Mountains are very remote and have 4WD access only. Volunteering is not available for this project. However, there are volunteering programs available at the more accessible Mount Buffalo National Park. Explore volunteer opportunities with the Parks Victoria tool, ParkConnect
  • Join the Safe Cat, Safe Wildlife community
  • If you are visiting areas with fox control, please adhere to signage, restrain domestic animals or pets, and do not disturb baits

Weed control

Central Highlands Eden is a landscape scale weed management project spanning across nearly 400,000 hectares of public land in Victoria’s Central Highlands. The project covers Baw Baw and Yarra Ranges national parks, Bunyip and Moondarra state parks, and all interconnecting state forests including Yarra, Noojee, Tanjil, Toombon and Thomson State Forests. This important local project helps protect native plants and animals and restores the biodiversity of the Central Highlands by managing invasive weeds.

The project aims to detect and remove high risk weeds that threaten biodiversity. It also focusses on preventing new weed species coming into the area and runs training sessions for local land managers, agency staff and community groups to identify and manage weeds.

This collaborative project is delivered by DELWP in partnership with Parks Victoria, Melbourne Water, VicRoads, Baw Baw Shire, Shire of Yarra Ranges, West Gippsland Water, West Gippsland Catchment Management Authority, SP AusNet, and the Walhalla Board of Management.

Target weeds

High risk weed species - over 85 species treated including English Broom (Cytisus scoparius), Gorse (Ulex europaeus), Montpellier Broom (Genista monspessulana), Tutsan (Hypericum androsaemum)

Native species of interest

Intact remnant vegetation of varying Ecological Vegetation Classes (EVCs)

Presence of threatened flora and fauna

Partners

DELWP, Parks Victoria, Melbourne Water, VicRoads, Baw Shire, Shire of Yarra Ranges, West Gippsland Water, West Gippsland Catchment Management Authority, SP AusNet, Walhalla Board of Management

How can you help?

  • Join your local Friends or Landcare group, or explore volunteer opportunities with the Parks Victoria tool, ParkConnect
  • Don’t spread weeds through the bush; practice good vehicle hygiene
  • Consider selection of garden plants carefully; many of our environmental weeds start out in gardens. Consider planting Victorian indigenous species. Practice responsible disposal of garden waste.
  • Report new and unusual plant/weed sightings to Agriculture Victoria

Central_Highlands_Eden

Image of Red Hot Poker plant (Kniphofia), an invasive weed found in the Central Highlands project area. Image courtesy of the Central Highlands project.

The Glenelg Eden is a landscape scale weed control project covering 210,000 hectares of public land in south-west Victoria. The project aims to reduce the impact of pest plants, preserve environmental values and give species such as the vulnerable Blotched Sun-orchid and the threatened Long-nosed Potoroo, the best chance to succeed.

The project targets more than 70 unique weed species invading state forest, national parks and public land in the Glenelg region. Of these 70 species there are new species and well established weeds. A highlight of the project has been the management of Common Climbing-Aloe (Aloiampelos ciliaris). By removing this weed, the project has supported the herb-rich woodlands, heathy woodland and lowland forests of Mt Clay State Forest; home to the rare Small-flower Grevillea, and the endangered Southern Brown Bandicoot.

Target weeds

High risk weed species - over 100 infestations with around 70 unique species

Native species of interest

Looking after a range of key Ecological Vegetations Classes (EVCs) across the landscape threatened by introduced species

Partners

DELWP, Parks Victoria

How can you help?

  • Join your local Friends or Landcare group, or explore volunteer opportunities with the Parks Victoria tool, ParkConnect
  • Don’t spread weeds through the bush; practice good vehicle hygiene
  • Consider selection of garden plants carefully; many of our environmental weeds start out in gardens. Consider planting Victorian indigenous species. Practice responsible disposal of garden waste.
  • Report new and unusual plant/weed sightings on or near Forest, parks and reserves in the far south west of the state, especially those in low numbers or recently detected, whether they are declared noxious (Scheduled weeds) in Victoria or not to Agriculture Victoria.

The Otway Eden is a landscape scale weed control project established in 2004 to protect native plants and animals and restore the biodiversity of the Otway Ranges National Park. The project delivers weed control across 140,000 hectares of the most valuable biodiversity hotspots in the parks and reserves of the Otways. The project targets well-established invasive weed species including Sallow Wattle, Coast Tea Tree, Blue Bell Creeper, Sweet Pittosporum and Boneseed.

The Otway Eden project aims to control the well-established weed species and prevent new weeds from establishing in the area. The project works with private landholders, local community groups and volunteers to spread the message of the threat of invasive weeds. The project is delivered by Parks Victoria in partnership with DELWP and with the support of local community groups and volunteers.

Target weeds

High risk weed species - 47 species including Sallow Wattle (Acacia longifolia), Coast Tea Tree (Leptospermum laevigatum), Blue Bell Creeper (Billardiera heterophylla), Sweet Pittosporum (Pittosporum undulatum), Boneseed (Chrysanthemoides monilifera).

Native species of interest

Metallic Sun-Orchid (Thelymitra epipactoides), Leafy Greenhood (Pterostylis cucullata), Anglesea Grevillea (Grevillea infecunda), Spiral Sun-orchid (Thelymitra matthewsii), Angahook Pink Fingers (Caladenia maritima)

Partners

Parks Victoria, DELWP, VicRoads, local government

How can you help?

  • Contact volunteer groups ANGAIR, Friends of Eastern Otways, Friends of Moggs Creek and Friends of the Anglesea Coast
  • Explore volunteer opportunities with the Parks Victoria tool,  ParkConnect
  • Don’t spread weeds through the bush; practice good vehicle hygiene
  • Consider selection of garden plants carefully; many of our environmental weeds start out in gardens. Consider planting Victorian indigenous species. Practice responsible disposal of garden waste.
  • Report new and unusual plant/weed sightings to Agriculture Victoria

Herbivore control

The Mallee Bounceback is a rabbit control project aiming to protect and restore the biodiversity of semi-arid woodlands in the Mallee. The project targets the rabbit, a known threat to the semi-arid woodlands of the Mallee. Rabbits cause great harm to the woodland environment by over-grazing, preventing the regeneration of native shrubs and trees, spread invasive weeds and by supporting high numbers of introduced predators.

While eradication is hard, the project aims to keep rabbit numbers below a threshold of one active warren entrance per hectare. Project officers conduct counts twice each year in autumn and spring. These counts cover remnant rangeland communities across parks, reserves, state forest, and private land (Neds Corner Station). Results from these counts are used to evaluate the effectiveness of investment in rabbit control. Hotspots of rabbit activity located through the counts can then be treated as a priority by the land manager.

The project is led by Parks Victoria and rabbit control is delivered across more than 100,000 hectares. This collaborative project is delivered in partnership with DELWP, First Peoples of the Millewa-Mallee Country and Barengi Gadgin Land Council, Mallee Catchment Management Authority, Wimmera Catchment Management Authority and Trust for Nature.

Target pest

European Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

Native species of interest

Semi-arid non-Eucalypt woodlands

Partners

Parks Victoria, DELWP, First Peoples of the Millewa-Mallee Country and Barengi Gadgin Land Council, Mallee Catchment Management Authority, Wimmera Catchment Management Authority and Trust for Nature

How can you help?

  • Join your local Friends or Landcare group, or explore volunteer opportunities with the Parks Victoria tool, ParkConnect
  • Learn more about the threat of rabbits  by visiting Agriculture Victoria.

Image of Mallee landscape courtesy of the Mallee Bounceback project.

Capability building

Weeds at the early stage of invasion, also known as early invaders, are plants that have naturalised and are starting to spread in the environment. There are many benefits to treating early invaders before they have spread widely; land managers save time and money, and the threat to biodiversity is reduced.

The WESI project is a capability building project that supports Victorian land managers to manage weeds that are in the early stage of invasion and a threat to biodiversity. The project assists land managers to identify, manage and reduce high risk weeds.

The project has developed a decision making framework and a number of tools to help public land and biodiversity managers through the process of recognising and dealing with the risk of early invader weeds. The project holds regular training activities and offers face-to-face support and guidance through social media. The project is delivered by the DELWP and provides training for Parks Victoria staff, public land managers, community groups and volunteers.

How can you help?

  • Connect through social media @weedyk8 including assistance with weed identification
  • Join your local Friends of Landcare group, or explore volunteer opportunities with the Parks Victoria tool, ParkConnect
  • Consider selection of garden plants carefully; many of our environmental weeds start out in gardens. Consider planting Victorian indigenous species. Practice responsible disposal of garden waste.
  • Don’t spread weeds through the bush; practice good vehicle hygiene
  • Report new and unusual plant/weed sightings to Agriculture Victoria

Find out more

Photo of opuntioid cacti identification training. Image courtesy Kate Blood.

Page last updated: 08/07/19